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REH Bookshelf - D

compiled by Rusty Burke

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Darwin, Charles | Daudet, Alphonse | Deaton, E.L. | De Casseres, Benjamin | De Castro, Adolphe | Defoe, Daniel | de Gourmont, Rémy | De Halve Maen | de la Mare, Walter | Dell, Floyd | Delmar, Viña | de Maupassant, Guy | De Quincey, Thomas | Derleth, August William | Dickens, Charles | Digby, Bassett | Dingle, Captain A. E. | Dixon, Olive K. | Dobie, James Frank | Dos Passos, John | Downey, Fairfax | Dowson, Ernest | Doyle, Sir Arthur Conan | Drama (general) | Dreiser, Theodore | Dulles, Foster Rhea | Dumas, Alexandre | Dunn, J. Allan | Dunsany, Lord | Duval, John C. | Dwyer, Bernard Austin

 


Darwin, Charles [Robert]

(1809-1882)

REH to Tevis Clyde Smith, week of 20 February 1928 [SL 1 #10]: lists Darwin among the thinkers who "look[ed] beyond the human" to the Cosmic.

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Daudet, Alphonse

(1840-1897)

REH to Harold Preece, ca. December 1928 [SL 1 #20]: [Regarding Sappho] "Has it been proved that she was a Lesbian in the generally accepted sense of the word?  Who ever accused her but... Daudet, a libertine, a grovelling ape who could see no good in anything..."

[Daudet's novel, Sapho, was published in 1884.  Mitchell Carroll, in Greek Women, Volume I of Woman; in all ages and in all countries (q.v., under "Various authors"), wrote: "As says Daudet, who of all recent writers has done most to degrade the name: 'The word Sappho itself, by the force of rolling descent through ages, is encrusted with unclean legends, and has degenerated from the name of a goddess to that of a malady.'" (p. 114).]

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Deaton, E.L.

Indian Fights on the Texas Frontier

A True Account of the Last Exciting Encounters With Redskins in Hamilton, Comanche, Brown, Erath and Adjoining Counties, as Recorded by E.L. Deaton, a Texan of Pioneer Days, and Republished by One of His Descendants -- Floyd J. Holmes, Fort Worth, Texas. Fort Worth: Pioneer Publishing Company, The Bunker Press, 1927.  30791 (author as Holmes, Fred; title as "Indian Frontier Fighters"); PQ3 (same as accessions list); GL (same as accessions list); TDB (author as "Holmes, Fred (probably Frederick Lionel Holmes, 1883-1946)"; title same as accessions list).  Still in HPU holdings.

REH to Tevis Clyde Smith, ca. May 1933: "I picked up an interesting book in Austin, by one Deaton, an old timer of Comanche County, dealing with Indian raids in Comanche, Brown, Hamilton, Erath and Bosque Counties in the 50's, 60's and early 70's."  

[Originally published as Indian Fights on the Texas Frontier, A History of Exciting Encounters Had with Indians in Hamilton, Comanche, Brown, Erath and Adjoining Counties (Hamilton, TX: C.M. Boynton, 1894).  There is no similar title by Frederick Lionel Holmes, nor by any other Fred Holmes.]

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De Casseres, Benjamin

(1873-1945)

"The Closed Room."

"The Door to the World" (aka "The Door to the Garden"): "I returned to my book and re-read those lines of de Casseres: ¶ 'I am at the door of the Closed Room, | I stand without, whispering and chatting to myself in many fantastic attitudes, | Like gnomes that skulk in castle-moats. | There are finger-marks on the door-knob – | Many, many have gone in, no one ever came out.' ¶ I re-read this and a curious impression stole over me, as if I had almost stumbled onto a depth of meaning beyond the accepted meaning of the lines...." [This poem appears in Frothingham, Songs of Adventure (q.v.).]

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De Castro, Adolphe

[originally Gustave Adolphe Danziger] (1859-1959)

Portrait of Ambrose Bierce

New York: The Century Co., 1929.  30680 (as "Castro"); PQ2; GL; TDB. 

REH to H.P. Lovecraft , ca. November 1932 [SL 2 #65]: "By the way, before I forget it: Belknap Long, who wrote the introduction to Danziger's Portrait of Ambrose Bierce – is he Frank Belknap Long, Jr.'s father?"  

[H.P. Lovecraft  to REH, 7 November 1932: "Long Jr. himself – not his father, who is a dentist – wrote the preface to old de Castro's Bierce book, and also revised the text.  I passed up the job because de Castro wouldn't meet my price.  At that period Long had a temporary affectation of leaving off his first name."] 

REH to H.P. Lovecraft , 6 March 1933: "...de Castro tells us Bierce was very proud of his skill at knife-throwing; de Castro himself found it necessary to put in a year at muscle-building."

"The Electric Executioner."

Weird Tales, August 1930. 

REH to H.P. Lovecraft, ca. August 1930 [SL 1 #41]: "Adolph de Castro, I note, mentions these gods, places, or whatever they are, only the spelling is different, as Cthulutl, Yog Sototl." 

H.P. Lovecraft  to REH, 14 August 1930: "Regarding the solemnly cited myth-cycle of Cthulhu, Yog Sothoth...etc. – let me confess that this is all a synthetic concoction of my own.... The reason for its echoes in Dr. de Castro's work is that the latter gentleman is a revision-client of mine – into whose tales I have stuck these glancing references for sheer fun."  

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  Defoe, Daniel

(1660-1731)

REH to Tevis Clyde Smith, 7 July 1923, in a listing of parodic book titles is "'Snobinson Do-So,' by Daniel DeFoe." [Robinson Crusoe, 1719]

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de Gourmont, Rémy

(1858-1915)

"Orange."

REH to Tevis Clyde Smith, 25 February 1925: "I've read Boccaccio, Dumas, Hugo, and a lot of those old libertines, but for polished obscenity, Remy de Gourmont takes the cake.   I'll quote a few lines, direct from one of his stories: 'The captain's hand slipped from her shoulder to her breast, while the other supported her yielding waist.  It is an eminently classical pose, the sequel of which is, not far from a bed of verdure, the difficulty of lifting a skirt caught under a recumbent body.  Sometimes the tender victim, her sense of folds not entirely lost in the ecstasy of her senses, comes to the lover's aid.' And so on."  

The quotation is from "Orange," originally published in Couleurs, contes nouveaux suivis de choses anciennes (1908).  This story is included in Little Blue Book #541, Stories in Green, Zinzolin, Rose, Purple, Mauve, Lilac and Orange: Howard's quotation does not match it quite word-for-word, but he may have quoted from memory.  I have found no other English translation of "Orange" prior to 1929.

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De Halve Maen

[Publication of The Holland Society.]

REH to Wilfred B. Talman, ca. July 1932: "Thanks very much for De Halve Maen.  I found it very interesting indeed, particularly the list of words of Dutch origin.  Noting that the Holland society is made up of people whose ancestors came to America before 1675 makes me feel almost like a recent immigrant." 

REH to H.P. Lovecraft , ca. November 1933: "Thanks for the loan of De Halve Maen. Talman used to mail me a copy, but I didn't get it this time.  I read the article you mentioned with much interest..." [See Lovecraft, "Some Dutch Footprints in New England."]

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de la Mare, Walter

(1873-1956)

REH to H.P. Lovecraft, ca. December 1932: de la Mare is listed among a number of poets Howard likes.

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Dell, Floyd

(1887-1969)

REH to H.P. Lovecraft, ca. December 1932 includes Dell among a group of writers of whom Howard says, "...three ringing razzberries for the whole mob....they're all wet smacks."  

Dell is mentioned in Howard's humorous poem, "A Fable for Critics."

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Delmar, Viña

(1905-     )

REH to Tevis Clyde Smith, ca. 14 March 1931: "As for Tyline Perry, I've never read anything by her, but I guess she's hot on the heels of Vina Delmar -- not in style, for I know naught of her line, but in fame, fortune and fertility."

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de Maupassant, Guy

(1850-1893)

Post Oaks and Sand Roughs, p. 36, named as a writer Lars [Jansen = Fowler Gafford] "had never heard of..."  

From "Surrender – Your Money or Your Vice" [a review of the movie "Surrender" (Universal, 1927), which Howard wrote for The Junto, September 1928]: "This picture follows the ancient and musty theme first exploited by de Maupassant, and is unusually dreary and lacking in interest..."  

REH to H.P. Lovecraft, ca. November 1932 [SL 2 #65]: "De Maupassant has power – undoubted power.  Too much power for me to read extensively.  Talk about Nordic gloom – his tales of French peasant life are enough to make a man want to cut his own throat.  After reading some of his more realistic yarns, I've been unable to see any good in anything, except thankfulness for the fact that I wasn't a Frenchman." 

De Maupassant is mentioned in Howard's poem, "A Poet's Skull" (as "de Maupason").

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De Quincey, Thomas

(1785-1859)

REH to Tevis Clyde Smith, ca. December 1928 [SL 1 #19]: "I've been reading the old masters for the past days and find that I get more solid enjoyment out of them than the moderns.  That age was more robust than ours, and they thought deeper, if more heavily – De Quincey at least, was certainly the forerunner of the school to which Poe contributed and I at present honor with my presence – literarily speaking – I mean the school of fantasy and horror writing."

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Derleth, August William

(1909-1971)

Afternoon In June | An Elegy for Mr. Danielson | Birkett's Twelfth Corpse | A Cloak from Messer Lando | Evening in Spring | Five Alone | Hawk on the Blue | Hawks Down the Wind | The Heritage of Sauk City | January Thaw | July Night | Lesandro's Familiar | The Metronome | Mr. Berbeck Had A Dream | Nellie Foster | Nine Strands in a Web | The No-Sayers | One Against the Dead | Panelled Room | Phantom Lights | Place of Hawks | Retreat to Nature | Tendency | Those Who Seek | Unnamed poems | Unnamed story | Woodcock in the Marshes

Derleth, August, and Mark Schorer: Colonel Markeson | A Matter of Faith | The Return of Andrew Bentley

General Mentions

REH began corresponding with Derleth at the end of 1932 and continued to do so until his death. 

REH to Tevis Clyde Smith, ca. September 1930 [SL 1 #44]: "I got a letter from Lovecraft and he referred to August Derleth; you know, the fellow that writes the very short stories that appear regularly in Weird Tales.  I was amazed to learn that Derleth is only twenty-one years old.  He must have started writing when he was about ten."  

REH to H.P. Lovecraft , ca. September 1930 [SL 1 #43]: "I was amazed to learn that August W. Derleth is only twenty-one.  He must have begun marketing his work at a very early age, for it seems that I have been reading his stories in Weird Tales for years.  My friends and I have often commented on the excellence of his products and wondered why he did not try his hand at longer stories." 

REH to H.P. Lovecraft , ca. September 1932: "Good for Derleth!  Which of his stories got the citations?  I've known for years that was of 'the right girt', as John A. Murrell used to say.  He's deserved much more notice from Weird Tales readers than he's gotten -- doubtless because of the shortness of his stories; the readers seem to like 'em long, generally.  More power to him; I wish him all the luck in the world." 

REH to August W. Derleth, ca. 15 December 1932: "I have followed your work in Weird Tales for several years, with great interest, and have more than once expressed my admiration for your stories both to Lovecraft and to the editors of the magazine."  

"Afternoon in June."

REH to August W. Derleth, 4 July 1935 [SL 2 #75]: "Thanks very much for the article, 'Afternoon in June'.  I got a big kick out of it."

"An Elegy for Mr. Danielson."

Weird Tales, August 1933

REH to August W. Derleth, ca. August 1933: "I got a kick out of your story in the current Weird Tales.  The idea of the Druidic stones and that chant for raising corpses carried real power and seemed to partly raise a dim curtain on monstrous twilight vistas."

"Birkett's Twelfth Corpse."

The Fantasy Fan, December 1933. 

REH to August W. Derleth, ca. December 1933: "I read with much interest your recent story in Fantasy Fan.  I remember you mentioning this yarn to me, when you first wrote it, saying it had been suggested by a drowning in the Wisconsin River.  It was a damned good story."

"A Cloak from Messer Lando."

Weird Tales, September 1934. 

REH to August W. Derleth, ca. October 1934: "I liked your 'Cloak From Messer Lando'.  You handle this type of story remarkably well."

Evening in Spring

Ms. [New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1941]

REH to August W. Derleth, ca. November 1933: "I am reading your splendid 'Evening in Spring' sent me by your friend in Arizona.  It is not a work to be read sketchily, and I am reading it slowly and with the deepest appreciation.  Thanks for the opportunity of seeing it." 

REH to August W. Derleth, ca. December 1933: "Yes, I'm enjoying 'Evening in Spring' very much indeed.  I must finish it before I'll feel capable of expressing my exact reactions, but all I've read so far has impressed me with your keen insight into human nature, and what is of equal value to me, your broad understanding of humanity, which is the only basis for intelligent tolerance."

"Five Alone."

Pagany, July-September 1932.

REH to August W. Derleth, 23 March 1933: "By the way, in what publication was the story, 'Five Alone' published?  I'd like very much to read it." 

REH to August W. Derleth, ca. May 1933: "I sure would like to read 'Five Alone' if you can lend me a copy of it." 

REH to August W. Derleth, ca. July 1933: "Thanks immensely for the opportunity of reading 'Five Alone'.  It is magnificent; real power, there.  I was gripped by it.  It really got under my hide as few stories can do.  The living members of that strange family, clinging to their morbid obsession, conversing with departed kin – say, did you draw them from real life?  Anyway, you managed to invest them with a startling reality.... I'm sure glad to hear that 'Five Alone' is to be published in the anthology you mentioned; it certainly deserves it." 

REH to August W. Derleth, ca. August 1933: "Yes, I certainly did enjoy 'Five Alone' and am not at all surprized that it received recognition from O'Brien and others." 

[See also Derleth, Place of Hawks]

"Hawk on the Blue."

Ms. [London Daily Express, 4 October 1934].

This story is based on an incident related to Derleth by Howard in a letter ca. October 1933.  In his next letter (also October 1933), Howard says, "By all means use the hawk incident if you wish... Far from having any objections, I'd feel sincerely honored.  I wish you the best of luck with it." 

REH to August W. Derleth, ca. November 1933: "I enjoyed reading your 'Hawk on the Blue' very much indeed.  That's the difference between a real writer and an ordinary one.  It never occurred to me that the incident held any particular literary possibilities, yet you have woven it into as fine a story of its kind as I ever read." 

REH to August W. Derleth, ca. December 1933: "I think Scribner's was nuts to turn down 'Hawk on the Blue.'"

"Hawks Down the Wind."

REH to August W. Derleth, 28 November 1935: "Thanks for the opportunity of reading of 'Hawks Down the Wind' and 'Woodcock in the Marshes'.  I admired very much the vividness of their style, and I heartily agree with their sentiments."

The Heritage of Sauk City

Preface (and alterations) by E.K. Hayes. Sauk City, WI: The Pioneer Press, 1931.

REH to August W. Derleth, ca. February 1933: "...thank you again for the book.  I found it most fascinating, and am rather sorry you decided to publish it anonymously; surely so rich and accurate a work should bear the name of its creator. ¶ It is easy to see that you have done a vast amount of research in gathering your data, and you are to be complimented on your energy, as well as on your ability in presenting this data.¶ Again, let me thank you for the history of Sauk City...."

"January Thaw."

REH to August W. Derleth, ca. January/February 1935: "First of all let me express belated thanks for the article 'January Thaw' which I read with much interest and appreciation."

"July Night."

REH to August W. Derleth, 1 November 1935: "I should have written you months ago to thank you for the opportunity of reading 'July Night', one of the finest bits of literature I've seen in many a day."

"Lesandro's Familiar."

Weird Tales, May 1936. 

REH to August W. Derleth, 9 May 1936: "I enjoyed your 'Lesandro's Familiar' a lot.  It was the best yarn in an issue not otherwise remarkable."

"The Metronome."

Weird Tales, February 1935. 

REH to August W. Derleth, ca. January/February 1935: "I got a big kick out of 'The Metronome'; one of the best weird shorts I ever read."

"Mr. Berbeck Had A Dream."

Weird Tales, November 1935. 

REH to August W. Derleth, 1 November 1935: "I enjoyed your story in the current Weird Tales – clever, and very well written, as of course all your yarns are.  It was somewhat different from most of your stories, but just as interesting."

"Nellie Foster."

Weird Tales, June 1933. 

REH to August W. Derleth, 3 July 1933: "I hardly have to say that I liked your latest story, because I've never encountered a story of yours that I didn't like."  (Mention of Derleth's comments on "Black Colossus" make it likely it is the story in the June 1933 issue to which he refers.)

"Nine Strands in a Web."

REH to August W. Derleth, ca. August 1933: "I look forward to reading... 'Nine Strands in a Web'." [See also Derleth, Place of Hawks]

"The No-Sayers."

[Brooklyn Eagle Magazine of Features, 21 April 1935].

REH to August W. Derleth, ca. December 1933: "I think Scribner's was nuts to turn down 'Hawk on the Blue.'  Hope you've hit them in the belly with 'The No-Sayers'."

"One Against the Dead."

REH to August W. Derleth, ca. October 1933: "Thanks very much for the opportunity of reading 'One Against the Dead', which I enjoyed greatly.  Like most of your work it has an intense feeling of reality – as if it must have happened.  I don't see why any high class magazine should reject it.  I especially like the suggestion of eeriness running through the story, not over-emphasized, but none the less powerful.  Or at least so it seems to me."

"Panelled Room."

Westminster Magazine, 1933.

REH to August W. Derleth, ca. October 1933: "And I intend to read your 'Panelled Room' if I can find the magazine mentioned."

"Phantom Lights."

The Fantasy Fan, May 1934. 

REH to August W. Derleth, 30 May 1934: "I enjoyed your story in Fantasy Fan..."

Place of Hawks

New York: Loring & Mussey, 1935.

REH to August W. Derleth, ca. May 1933: "I hope you've had good luck with 'Place of Hawks' and the other stories." 

REH to August W. Derleth, ca. August 1933: "I look forward to reading 'Place of Hawks'..." 

REH to August W. Derleth, ca. September 1933: "Hope you placed the 'Place of Hawks' with Scribner's." 

REH to August W. Derleth, ca. March/April 1934: "I look forward to seeing 'Place of Hawks' in book form..." 

[The volume contains "Five Alone," "Faraway House," "Nine Strands in a Web," and the title story.]

"Retreat to Nature."

REH to August W. Derleth, 9 May 1936: "Thanks very much for 'Retreat to Nature.'  You've put into words, vividly and powerfully, what I've tried to say in my stumbling way several times – to derision of various would-be sophisticates.  I'm going to keep your article handy and brandish it in their faces next time instead of busting them over the head with a branding iron as I contemplated."

"Tendency."

REH to August W. Derleth, ca. October 1933: "The announcement of 'Tendency' looks good."

"Those Who Seek."

Weird Tales, January 1932. 

REH to The Eyrie, March 1932: "If I were to express a preference for any one of the tales, I believe I should name Derleth's Those Who Seek..."

Unnamed poems

REH to August W. Derleth, ca. July 1933: "Thanks too for the poem; it is a fine piece of work.  I'd like to see more of your poetry." 

REH to August W. Derleth, ca. August 1933: "Thanks immensely for the poems.  You can certainly conceive magnificent titles, and the poems match the titles.  I like your verse fully as well as your prose, and that, God knows, is no depreciation of your prose.  There is depth and power in your poetry, a strong tranquill flowing as of a deep river.  I am not merely weaving complimentary images politely; this is my honest emotion." 

REH to August W. Derleth, 4 September 1933: "I found your poems, as always, delightful.  I don't know which I like best.  Each has poignant charm of its own, and all its own.  Your poetry clings close to the very roots of Life." 

REH to August W. Derleth, ca. October 1933: "I also liked your poem, and sympathize with your feeling in regard to hawks."  

REH to August W. Derleth, ca. December 1933: "I enjoyed your poem greatly.  I do not pretend to understand all its imagery...But I have read it again and again, fascinated by its melody and depth and power."

Unnamed story

REH to August W. Derleth, ca. October 1933: "I note with interest Scribner's criticism of your story, saying that the atmosphere was too much superior to the story.  That is a peculiar criticism.  As far as I'm concerned, atmosphere and story are both splendid." 

REH to August W. Derleth, 11 December 1934: "I liked your story in the Not at Night Anthology."

"Woodcock in the Marshes."

REH to August W. Derleth, 28 November 1935: "Thanks for the opportunity of reading of 'Hawks Down the Wind' and 'Woodcock in the Marshes'.  I admired very much the vividness of their style, and I heartily agree with their sentiments."

Derleth, August, and Mark Schorer

"Colonel Markeson."

Weird Tales, June 1934. 

REH to August W. Derleth, 30 May 1934: "I...look forward to your story in the June Weird Tales."

"A Matter of Faith."

Weird Tales, December 1934.

REH to August W. Derleth, 11 December 1934: "I enjoyed your yarn in the latest Weird Tales.  You have collaborated with Schorer on quite a number of stories, have you not?  I do not seem to remember ever having seen his name except in collaboration with you, though doubtless he has written numbers of stories."

"The Return of Andrew Bentley."

Weird Tales, September 1933. 

REH to August W. Derleth, 4 September 1933: "I liked your story in the current Weird Tales very much, also."

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Dickens, Charles

(1812-1870)

REH to H.P. Lovecraft , ca. November 1932 [SL 2 #65]: "I wouldn't take anything, though, for my early readings of Scott, Dickens, and other English writers.  I doubt if I could read Dickens now – with the exception of Pickwick Papers which is my favorite of all his books.  He gets on my nerves, not so much by his tedium, as by the spineless cringing crawling characters he portrays.  I don't doubt he was drawing them true to life, but that realization makes the matter more damnable.  Nicholas Nickleby was about the only one of his characters who had any guts at all.  Why good gad, his characters submitted to indignities and insults and outrages that made me grind my teeth merely to read about.  And I'm a peacable man." 

Tevis Clyde Smith, "Adventurer in Pulp," names Dickens among Howard's favorite writers.

The Posthumous Papers of The Pickwick Club

Being a Faithful Record of the Perambulations, Perils, Travels, Adventures, and Sporting Transactions of the Corresponding Members.  Edited by "Boz."  London: Chapman and Hall, 1837. 

[See above, in general section on Dickens.]

The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby

London: Chapman and Hall, 1839.  30603; PQ2; GL; TDB. 

[See above, in general section on Dickens.]  

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Digby, [George] Bassett

(1888-     )

Tigers, Gold and Witch Doctors

New York: Harcourt, Brace & Co., 1928. 30695; PQ2; GL; TDB.

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Dingle, Captain A[ylward] E[dward]

(1874-    )

"The Burial of Billy."

Adventure, 20 March 1922. 

[See Appendix Two]  

"Red Saunders' Protege."

Adventure, 1 July 1921. 

[See Appendix Two]

"A Shot at a Venture."

Adventure, 20 May - 10 June 1922 (3 parts). 

[See Appendix Two]

"Smuggled Guns."

Adventure ? 

[See Appendix Two]

"Tides of Hate."

Adventure, 20 January 1922.

[See Appendix Two]

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Dixon, Olive K.

(1873-1954)

Life of "Billy" Dixon

Plainsman, Scout and Pioneer; A Narrative in which are Described Many Things Relating to the Early Southwest, with an Account of the Fights Between Indians and Buffalo Hunters at Adobe Walls and at Buffalo Wallow, for which Congress voted the Medal of Honor to the Survivors.  Originally published in 1914;  Revised Edition, Dallas: P.L. Turner Co., 1927.  30592; PQ2; GL; TDB. 

REH to H.P. Lovecraft , 13 May 1936, quotes passages from pages v., 5-6, 116-117, 243, 249, and 251 of the revised edition.

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Dobie, James Frank

(1888-1964)

Coronado's Children

Tales of Lost Mines and Buried Treasures of the Southwest. Dallas, The Southwest Press, 1930.  30675; PQ2; GL; TDB. 

REH to Tevis Clyde Smith, ca. February 1931: "Dobie's book has certainly made a hit; and I understand he had the Devil's own time getting it published." 

REH to August W. Derleth, 3 July 1933: "I have Dobie's 'Coronado's Children' which I'll be glad to lend you, if you wish." 

REH to August W. Derleth, ca. July 1933: "You will read much of San Saba river and the surrounding territory in 'Coronado's Children.'" 

One Who Walked Alone, p. 147: "'Ever read Coronado's Children?' he asked. ¶ 'No,' I said, 'but I've heard of it.  J. Frank Dobie's?' ¶ 'Yeah,' he said.  'It's a damn good book.  You ought to read it.'"

A Vaquero of the Brush Country

Dallas: The Southwest Press, 1929. 

REH to August W. Derleth, 3 July 1933: "His 'Vaquero of the Brush Country' has even more solid meat in it [i.e., than Coronado's Children], though it doesn't make quite such interesting reading."

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Dos Passos, John

(1896-1970)

Mentioned in Howard's humorous poem, "A Fable for Critics."

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Downey, Fairfax [Davis]

(1893-1990)

The Grande Turke

Suleyman the Magnificent, Sultan of the Ottomans.  New York: Minton, Balch & Co., 1929. 30768; PQ2; GL; TDB.

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Dowson, Ernest [Christopher]

(1867-1900)

"Non Sum Qualis Eram Bonae Sub Regno Cynarae."

This poem has long been thought the source of the second line of Howard's suicide couplet, "All fled, all done, so lift me on the pyre; | The feast is over and the lamps expire."  In the fourth stanza of Dowson's poem appears the phrase, "But when the feast is finished and the lamps expire...."  However, our research has unearthed a likelier source for Howard's couplet.  See Garvin, Viola.

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Doyle, Sir Arthur Conan

(1859-1930)

REH to Tevis Clyde Smith, 7 July 1923: "If you know of any other Doyle books I can get cheap, please let me know." 

REH to Tevis Clyde Smith, 7 July 1923, in a listing of parodic book titles are "'The Valley of Beer,' by A. Conan Doyle" [The Valley of Fear, 1915] and "'The Return of Sheerluck Holmes,' by A. Conan Doyle" [The Return of Sherlock Holmes, 1905]. 

Post Oaks and Sand Roughs, p. 36, named as a writer Lars [Jansen = Fowler Gafford] "had never heard of..." 

REH to H.P. Lovecraft, ca. December 1932: Doyle is listed among those Howard refers to as "my favorite writers." 

REH to H.P. Lovecraft , ca. May-June 1933 [SL 2 #67]:  "My tastes and habits are simple; I am neither erudite nor sophisticated.  I prefer jazz to classical music, musical burlesques to Greek tragedy, A. Conan Doyle to Balzac, Bob Service's verse to Santayana's writing, a prize fight to a lecture on art."

Conan Doyle's Best Books

Sherlock Holmes Edition.  New York: P.F. Collier & Son, n.d.  30661(vol. IV[?])-30662 (vol. II); PQ2 (no vol. no.); GL (vol. II, IV); TDB (vol. II, IV).  

[There were only three volumes in this set: on the accessions list, what looks like a Roman numeral "IV" may simply be a hastily written "III".   Volume I: A Study in Scarlet, and Other Stories, includes "The Original of Sherlock Holmes" by Dr. Harold Emery Jones; A Study in Scarlet; "A Scandal in Bohemia"; "A Case of Identity"; "My Friend the Murderer"; "The Surgeon of Gaster Fell"; "Cyprian Overbeck Wells"; "The Ring of Thoth"; and "John Huxford's Hiatus."  Volume II, The Sign of The Four, and Other Stories, includes The Sign of the Four; "The Mystery of Sasassa Valley"; "The American's Tale"; "Our Derby Sweepstakes"; "A Night Among the Nihilists"; "Bones"; "Elias B. Hopkins"; "John Barrington Cowles"; "The Secret of Goresthorpe Grange"; "The Captain of the 'Pole-Star'"; "J. Habakuk Jephson's Statement"; "The Great Keinplatz Experiment"; "The Man From Archangel"; and "That Little Square Box."  Volume III: The White Company; Beyond the City includes just those two stories.]

The Firm of Girdlestone

London: Chatto & Windus, 1890.  30613; PQ2; GL; TDB.

His Last Bow

London: John Murray, 1917.  30793; PQ2; GL; TDB. 

REH to Tevis Clyde Smith, 7 July 1923: "I'm going to buy your 'His Last Bow' by A. Conan Doyle."  [Contents: "Preface" by Dr. John H. Watson, M.D.; "The Adventure of the Wisteria Lodge"; "The Adventure of the Cardboard Box"; "The Adventure of the Red Circle"; "The Adventure of the Bruce-Partington Plans"; "The Adventure of the Dying Detective"; "The Disappearance of Lady Frances Carfax"; "The Adventure of the Devil's Foot"; "His Last Bow."]

The Hound of the Baskervilles

London: George Newnes, Ltd., 1902.  30781; PQ2; GL; TDB.

This title was included in the International Adventure Library (q.v.)

The Lost World

London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1912.  30612; PQ2; GL; TDB. 

REH to Tevis Clyde Smith, 7 July 1923: "As for 'The Lost World,' I bought that a month ago."

The Maracot Deep, and Other Stories

Garden City, NY: Doubleday, Doran, 1929.  30821; PQ2; GL; TDB.

[Contents: The Maracot Deep | The Disintegration Machine | The Story of Spedegue's Dropper | When the World Screamed.]

The Poison Belt

Being an Account of Another Amazing Adventure of Professor Challenger.  New York: Hodder and Stoughton/George H. Doran Co., [1913].  30708; PQ1; GL; TDB.  Still in HPU holdings. 

[Note in PQ1: "In the lower left corner of the front pastedown endpaper is the stamp, 'A.F. Von Blon for Books | Waco Texas.'"]

The Return of Sherlock Holmes

London: George Newnes, Ltd., 1905. 30704; PQ2; GL; TDB. 

[Contents: "The Adventure of the Empty House"; "The Adventure of the Norwood Builder"; "The Adventure of the Dancing Men"; "The Adventure of the Solitary Cyclist"; "The Adventure of the Priory School"; "The Adventure of Black Peter"; "The Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton"; "The Adventure of the Six Napoleons"; "The Adventure of the Three Students"; "The Adventure of the Golden Pince-Nez"; "The Adventure of the Missing Three-Quarter"; "The Adventure of the Abbey Grange"; "The Adventure of the Second Stain."]

The Sign of Four

London: Spencer Blackett, 1890.  30598 (as "The Sign of the Four"); PQ2; GL; TDB. 

[The Sign of The Four is Doyle's original title for this novel, as originally published in Lippincott's Monthly Magazine, London, 1890.  It was first published under the title The Sign of Four in The Bristol Observer, 1890, and has been published in numerous editions under either title.]

The Valley of Fear

London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1915. 

REH to Tevis Clyde Smith, 7 July 1923: "Would you set a price on your 'Valley of Fear' by A. Conan Doyle, or do you care to sell it?"  

Tevis Clyde Smith to REH, 2 August 1923: "How did you like 'The Valley of Fear'?"

The White Company

[See above, Conan Doyle's Best Books.]  

REH to H.P. Lovecraft , ca. 9 August 1932: "Like Samkin Aylward, I warm to a man with the bitter drop in him."  

Aylward is a character in The White Company.  On page 70 of the Conan Doyle's Best Books edition (Volume III), Aylward is quoted: "I warm to a man who hath some gall in his liver."  

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Drama (general)

REH to Tevis Clyde Smith, ca. week of 20 February 1928: (following untitled scenario) "…I never studied the technique of drama and never read very many."  

REH to Harold Preece, ca. December 1928: "I seldom read drama."

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Dreiser, Theodore [Herman Albert]

(1871-1945)

REH to H.P. Lovecraft, ca. December 1932, includes Dreiser among a group of writers of whom Howard says, "...three ringing razzberries for the whole mob....they're all wet smacks."

An American Tragedy

New York: Boni & Liveright, 1925. 

One Who Walked Alone, p. 258: "He kept saying it reminded him of Theodore Dreiser's book, An American Tragedy.  Bob said men like that, who got out on the street corner and tried to preach, were tragic, inarticulate fools."

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Dulles, Foster Rhea

(1900-1970)

The Old China Trade

Boston and New York: Houghton Mifflin Co., The Riverside Press Cambridge, 1930.  30599; PQ1; GL; TDB.  Still in HPU holdings.

[Note in PQ1: "Some of the illustrations in this book would have been appropriate in Howard's own books. The following are from the list of illustrations: 'The "Boston" Taken by Savages at Mootka Sound,' 'Attack and Massacre of Crew of Ship "Tonquin" by the Savages of the Northwest Coast,' 'A Chinese Opium Den,' and 'The Capture of Ting-Hai, Chusan.'"]

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Dumas, Alexandre

(1802-1870)

REH to Tevis Clyde Smith, 7 July 1923, in a listing of parodic book titles is "'The Vicomte de Brag-a-lot,' by Alexandre Dumas" [The Vicomte de Bragelonne, 1847]. 

REH to Tevis Clyde Smith, 25 February 1925: "I've read... Dumas...and a lot of those old libertines..." 

Post Oaks and Sand Roughs, p. 36, named as a writer Lars [Jansen = Fowler Gafford] "had never heard of..." 

REH to H.P. Lovecraft , ca. November 1932 [SL 2 #65]: "Dumas has a virility lacking in other French writers – I attribute it to his negroid strain – but his historical fiction lacks, at least to me, the gripping vividness of Sir Walter Scott, for instance..." 

Tevis Clyde Smith, "So Far the Poet...":  “His defense of Milady de Winter and her son Mordaunt. ‘She was his mother’; We argued over this several times.”  Milady de Winter is a character in The Three Musketeers, while her son Mordaunt is featured in Twenty Years After.

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Dunn, J[oseph] Allan [Elphinstone]

(1872-1941)

[See Appendix Three]

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Dunsany, Lord

[Edward John Moreton Drax Plunkett] (1878-1957)

REH to H.P. Lovecraft , ca. October 1930 [SL 1 #47]: "I have read...some of...Dunsany..." 

REH to H.P. Lovecraft, ca. December 1932: Dunsany is listed among a number of poets Howard likes. 

REH to H.P. Lovecraft , 6 March 1933: "As far as I'm concerned, your stories and poems are superior to anything of the sort ever written by Dunsany, Machen, Poe, or any of the others."

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Duval, John C[rittendon]

(1816-1897)

The Adventures of Bigfoot Wallace

the Texas Ranger and Hunter.  Macon, GA: J.W. Burke, 1870. 30775; PQ2; GL; TDB. 

REH to Tevis Clyde Smith, ca. May 1931: "Thanks very much for the Frontier Times... Did you read Big-Foot's adventures?  Boy, Pink [Lindsey Tyson] and I nearly busted laughing over it.  There was a red-blooded character in a red-blooded epoch!" 

[REH to Tevis Clyde Smith, ca. 18 May 1931: "Wish you'd get me a Frontier Times and keep it till I see you; I want to see my reprint."  Frontier Times (q.v.), June 1931, reprinted Howard's "The Ghost of Camp Colorado."  In that same issue appeared an installment of The Adventures of Big-Foot Wallace (chapters 39-42, though not indicated in the magazine) by John C. Duval, with the note, "First published in 1870." Also included was "Letters of 'Big Foot Wallace,' contributed by Mrs. Nora C. Franklin McCormick, in the introduction to which it is stated that "for the past year or more Frontier Times has been publishing the 'Adventures of Big Foot Wallace' serially..."  Howard may have either sought out or borrowed earlier issues of Frontier Times, or have bought the original edition of the book, because in REH to H.P. Lovecraft , ca. October 1931, he relates the story of Big-Foot's "Fight with the 'Big Indian'" in a manner which suggests he had read chapter 13 of the book.  A reprint edition of the book was issued in 1936.]

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Dwyer, Bernard Austin

(1897-1943)

"Brooklyn Nights."

Bernard A. Dwyer to REH, n.d. (probably December 1931 or January 1932): "The Brooklyn faun story – I had long desired to make some record of the electric-litten nights of Brooklyn, the Y which seemed to me a recreation of ancient Greece, and the extraordinary physical beauty and grace of that youngster." 

Bernard A. Dwyer to REH, n.d. (probably ca. March/April 1932): "The only manuscript I can find to enclose is 'Brooklyn Nights,' for which you may not care.  The title isn't strikingly original, but as my memories of the times described in the story is mostly of the electrically litten nights of Brooklyn, The YMCA and Atlantic Avenue, it seemed the most apposite I could think of.  As I said once before, the story is merely a more or less successful attempt to crystallize on paper some of the impressions of the city made on me, a country boy, at the time – also to give some faint idea of my reaction to the 'Y', and the grace and beauty of the young diver therein mentioned....I did not imagine the story would sell – I hardly see how it could, in W.T.  It is, however, a relation of simple fact – with the exception of the faun's inadvertent 'recollection' – up to the point where we take that walk – thereafter all is obviously fantasy.  One writer has told me that the shift from reality to fantasy is too abrupt.  Doubtless this is true.  You will notice that I have stricken off the appended afterword.  It is not needed, and I think the story much more effective to learn it when the narrator, after the disappearance of the faun, finds himself alone, gazing into the enchanted pool in the haunted greenwood.  Pardon the Poe cadences – I can't help them.  They will creep in, despite of all I can do.  I know the ending sounds almost identical with that of 'The Island of the Fay'... I don't think this story is effective – I am learning to try to cut down on description and give more action.  It doesn't satisfy me, reading it over.  The only idea was, as I said, to get down impressions of those nights in Brooklyn, around the green pool in the YMCA." 

REH to H.P. Lovecraft, ca. 24 May 1932: "Your mention of Dwyer reminds me that I owe him a letter.  He recently let me read his 'Brooklyn Nights' which I found fascinating.  He is a natural poet." 

H.P. Lovecraft  to REH, 8 June 1932: "Yes – Dwyer's 'Brooklyn Nights' is real poetry of a sort.  It is the only thing that ever made me able to see Brooklyn in a favorable light!"

"Ol' Black Sarah."

Weird Tales, October 1928. 

REH to H.P. Lovecraft, ca. September 1930 [SL 1 #43]: "I have noted Mr. Dwyer's letters in 'The Eyrie,' and remember the poem you mention."  

[This was Dwyer's sole contribution to Weird Tales.]

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